Make a difference

Little things count as to whether your house burns or not

With the hot weather coming in a few short weeks it is time to check over the house and our surrounds, including our gardens (if we have them), to ensure they are at low risk of catching alight.

In view of the need for helping residents to be at lower risk from bushfires, back in March 2019, a group of us with the support of Senator Linda Reynolds and Member for Forrest MP, Nola Marino, decided to conduct an event that would help residents in bushfire-prone areas making themselves and their properties safer.

On Sunday 1 May 2019 we had a morning Firewise Excursion. We were delighted that Mrs Nola Marino was able to attend and contribute to the discussion. We started with a scene-setting exercise of exploring the differing facets of bushfire in the South West: its high frequency, how to prevent embers from entering into roof spaces, etc. We used a series of seven posters each of which highlighted an aspect of the problem.  Here is a link to the Gardens0fFire_series Poster exhibition which drew on the rather sombre book by Robert Kenny who had his house destroyed in the Victorian Bushfires of 2009.

The Excursion was named as being “Firewise“. This is derived from a program of this name developed in the US by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).  House and garden design that aims to reduce bushfire risk is crucial as is re-engineering existing houses and gardens to protect against ember attack and, occasionally, direct flame contact.

The Firewise concept was developed out of the research work of wildfire scientist, Dr Jack Cohen, who studied the aftermath of many wildfires and in particular the way a house will burn down. Contrary to popular belief it is not a great wall of flame, rather it is the embers getting into nooks and crannies around a house, including vents, and smouldering then erupting into flames and burning the house down from the inside. He stresses the need for defensible space near the house which is kept at very low fuel levels to ensure embers are not created there, there is nothing to burn and there is little chance of direct flame attack.

The scene setting exercise was useful as it stimulated a lively discussion about the many different aspect of what can be done by residents and fire authorities to make everyone safer.

We had short summary papers which contain online links to further information.  These are: Firewise excursion Intro and Firewise excursion Parkland.

We then had a break in the weather and were able to see Yarri Park as an example of Parkland Cleared.  See the “before” image, below.

Revegetation_YP_14Oct16_IMG_4781

Yarri Park.The large trees are a eucalypt, Eucalyptus patens, or Yarri which grow only in favoured spots in the South West – high rainfall and deep soils – such as here in Balingup. This is the “before picture” showing high buildup of understory which when dried out becomes a bushfire risk. 

Here is the Park after a full week of activity to clean out much of the understory, make the Park easier to walk through and to maintain as well as being at a lower risk of bushfire to surrounding neighbours.

YarriPark_After_15Nov16

The “after picture” showing Parkland Cleared result.

We then headed out to an attractive property which used to be Birdwood Park near Balingup townsite which is a good example of a property being made to be at low risk of bushfire attack. Considerable quantities of vegetation were removed and any trees near the house were usually deciduous or were at the low end of the flammability scale, eg Indian Hawthorn, Raphiolepis indica, and Coprosma or Mirror Bush.

Then the next front came through and we dashed back to the Fire Shed or headed home.

Some more ideas about Firewise_Property_Design_Sep19 are contained in this document. There are links to further material in this to follow up should you want to know more.

Even removing the layer of mulch that you spread carefully in that garden bed next to the house could make you safer. It would mean that embers would fall on bare ground instead of potential fuel. A few small changes like this could make the difference.