Wattles are worse*

Wattles are often added to a property to provide shade and possibly firewood for later. Whilst the smaller shrubby ones are easy to remove when they become scraggly and start to die back, the larger trees such as Cedar Wattles, Black Wattles and Blackwood Wattles cause a whole lot of problems as they age.

IMG_9100

Overall scene showing the fallen trunk of a Cedar Wattle which fell across the path to the hillside. It damaged the fence, pushed a strainer post and crushed a young Tupelo tree near the stream. In the centre of the image to the rear is a wattle in flower that shows a scar on its trunk where a large lateral branch fell off and struck the Cedar Wattle some months ago. This has subsequently fallen on Tuesday 28 August 2018

After perhaps twenty or thirty years of growth they become large trees which then will drop limbs, split or fall over entirely, damaging everything in their path.  By this time they are large trees and are costly to remove. Thus many owners are stuck in a dilemma; the ageing wattles will become more dangerous, but it is very expensive to remove them.

Here is a video taken earlier this year before the Cedar Wattle came down.

The trunk of the Cedar Wattle that fell is just behind the large post in the fence shown at the beginning.

The Cedar Wattle becomes brittle with age and branches split, but may not come away entirely.

IMG_9113

The remaining trunk of the Cedar Wattle has side branches which have split (see example near top of image). The tree has become dangerous as branches or the whole tree have become unsound. Note to the left a dead branch from another tree is suspended in the branches which could fall at any time.

The following video shows more of the ageing wattles and what can happen to them and anything in the way.

One less wattle, several more to go though hopefully in a more controlled way.

The moral of the story is not to plant them in the first place or only as quick screening to be taken out when small because they are not only a hazard with falling branches or the like, they also drop litter – leaves, twigs, pods – which add to the litter layer, being highly flammable, and will aid the spreading of bushfire in summer.

*The title has a little to do with alliteration, but it sums up some of the features of the larger wattles (acacias) which do not suit them for being near structures, not just homes but also near fences or bridges, etc.